Topic:

Barack Obama

President Obama’s Cairo Speech: The Question Left Unanswered – Iran

| June 9, 2009

Obama’s “soft power” approach cannot form the basis for a sound, workable American strategy in the Middle East. The speech lacked resolve regarding the most urgent problem for Israel and America’s other regional allies – the imminent threat of Iran’s nuclear weapons program.

A Growing Divergence Between Jerusalem and Washington?

| May 11, 2009

Obama’s intention to “engage” countries like Iran and Syria in order to
start a “new page” in bilateral relations strike most Israelis and Mideast Arabs as naïve. Both the Arabs and Israel want to see Iran and its proxies rolled back, not appeased, by Washington.

Obama and Netanyahu: Idealism vs. Pragmatism

| March 18, 2009

Obama’s idealism will face harsh realities that limit his policy options,
especially with regard to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and Iran.
Obama and Netanyahu are both pragmatic leaders capable of adjusting to realities; and thus can be expected to make efforts to avoid a major confrontation.

Obama and the Muslim Cold War

| January 28, 2009

Throughout the Middle East, deep Muslim political divide could stymie
President Obama’s well-intentioned Mideast efforts. Mainstream Arab
countries, like Israel, seek US resolve in confronting the Iranian-led axis, not an “outstretched American hand” to the radical part of the Muslim world.

Europe May Yet Long For George W. Bush

| January 18, 2009

Hatred of, and disdain for, George W. Bush was the European excuse
for refusing American requests for diplomatic and military cooperation.
How will Europe, which is in love with Obama, now justify saying no?

President Obama and the Middle East Challenge

| November 6, 2008

Barack Obama has enunciated a clear program for Middle East policy based on multilateralism and negotiations to deal with Iran, Iraq and the Arab-Israeli conflict. In reality he will have to make tough choices when other countries reject the US approach, especially with regard to Iran.